This is the third year Christie has brought its projection mapping to this colorful festival.

Featured Project: Christie Technology on Display at Guadalajara Festival of Lights


Cypress, California-based audio-visual company Christie announces that it was the technology partner at GDLUZ, the recently festival of light in Guadalajara, Mexico, for the third straight year.

Organized by the local company Alteacorp in conjunction with the local government, the festival celebrates the 477th anniversary of the founding of Guadalajara, the capital of the Mexican state of Jalisco. Held in the city’s old quarters, it featured 40 attractions inspired by light, making it Mexico’s biggest night-time festival. Guadalajara residents, known as Tapatíos, were treated to an array of video mappings, multimedia shows, interactive projections, live music, art installations and performances which drew crowds of more than 1.1 million over the course of the four days.​

One of the festival’s main attractions was a mapping projection at Instituto Cabañas, using a Christie Boxer 4K30 3DLP projector with 30,000 lumens center and 4K resolution.

“We opted for this particular projector because of its resolution and power,” says Carlos Márquez, director of projections at Alteacorp. “It’s a superb projector, easy to use and incredibly powerful. In my opinion it is one of the jewels in the crown of Christie.”

Another of the show’s strong points was the way people were able to interact with a different video mapping, which used a Christie Crimson WU25 3DLP technology laser projector with WUXGA resolution and 25,000 center lumens.

“In this case, we chose this equipment because of the short throw distance and the sharpness of the image,” Márquez says. “A really crucial factor in ensuring a truly successful interactive show was that the projector can reduce the projection area dynamically, and this allows you to concentrate the projection in a very short space.”

To run the various projections, Alteacorp used the Christie Pandoras Box 6.0 media server—more specifically a Pandoras Box Manager, and a Pandoras Box Player​.

“In the case of the mapping at Instituto Cabañas, Pandoras Box was the critical element in the project, because it was what made it possible to synchronize the lighting, the audio, the video and the fireworks,” Marquez says. “In the interactive project, we used a Pandoras Box Player to capture the videogame from a second system.”

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